One thing that unhappy lawyers often tell me is that they don’t want to do anything that looks like a job; they just want enough money to not have to show up at work and deal with all the crap. That’s a huge sign of burnout, and of being in a job that doesn’t offer you what you need in any way, shape, or form.

Cover of Drive
What if carrots and sticks don't actually work well to motivate you? Find out in the Unhappy Lawyers Book Club on Sept. 15, 2011.

So of course the next question is: What job would give me what I need? Regulars here at Leaving Law know (and newcomers will soon learn!) there is no cut-and-dried answer to that question, much as you might wish there were.

But the reason why is the best reason of all. It’s that every one of you unhappy lawyers is a wonderful individual, with your own unique talents, skills and experiences. Each one of you has something unique that you find meaningful and important. That is the place where you will do your best work, and your happiest, most engaged work. The work that hardly feels like work at all.

Many lawyers, if not most, harbor the belief that the only thing motivating people to work are carrots and sticks. The carrot of big-ass, ridiculous salaries and bonuses, and the sticks of failure, fear, ridicule, shame and disbarment. Most lawyers, maybe even you, don’t really believe in intrinsic motivation. Probably because the last time you experienced it was in grade school, before the credential-accumulating, resume-building lifestyle began in earnest.

Yet according to Daniel Pink, author of Drive, intrinsic motivation is completely where it’s at not only for individuals, but even—gasp—for businesses. In the Unhappy Lawyers Book Club and in my blog, we’ll explore why that is, and how you can bring intrinsic motivation to life in your own alternative legal career.

I got a lot out of Pink’s prior book, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. It really changed the way I view what’s going on in the current economy, and gave me a useful lens to see many corporate policies through.

In Drive, Pink builds on his thesis that right-brained workers will rule the future economy, and delves into the science and research of human motivation to explain why. Pink may be, as he calls himself in his TED talk, a failed lawyer, but he is certainly a highly successful writer and thinker.

In his TED talk in 2009, Pink explains his approach:

It’s an approach built much more around intrinsic motivation. Around the desire to do things because they matter, because we like it, because they’re interesting, because they are part of something important. And to my mind, that new operating system for our businesses revolves around three elements: autonomy, mastery and purpose.

  • Autonomy, the urge to direct our own lives.
  • Mastery, the desire to get better and better at something that matters.
  • Purpose, the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves.

These are the building blocks of an entirely new operating system for our businesses.

Maybe it can also be the approach for a new operating system for your new career and life.

Unhappy Lawyers Book Club, the Details

So here’s the skinny on the Drive edition of the Unhappy Lawyers Book Club:

Date: September 15, 2011

Time: 1:30 pm—2:00 pm ET

Format: Conference call

Call-in info: (209) 647-1000. The access code is 535240# (yes you need to enter the # sign).

Cost: Free!

You can also like my FaceBook page and get more frequent updates about the book club, like questions I’m pondering as I read, or insights that may not make it into a blog post.

Want to get added to the email list for the Unhappy Lawyers Book Club? Drop me a line at jalvey@jenniferalvey.com. I won’t sell your info or otherwise give it to a third party.

I’ll talk to you on Sept. 15!

Jennifer Alvey is a recovering lawyer who loves helping unhappy attorneys figure out their intrinsic motivation—i.e., what sets them on fire. If you’re having trouble figuring that out, schedule a discounted sample coaching session with Jennifer. Email jalvey@jenniferalvey.com for details.